Patricia Spilman: profile

Background: 

Patricia Spilman is Senior Scientist in the Drug Discovery Laboratory at UCLA and the Bredesen Lab at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA. She is a neuroscientist with over 20 years of experience in neurodegenerative disease research, including 12 years with world-renowned neuropathologist Stephen J. DeArmond, M.D., Ph.D., and Nobel Laureate, Stanley Prusiner, M.D. at the University of California, San Francisco.

For the last ten years, Patricia's focus has been on development of new therapeutics as part of an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) drug discovery team following a pharmaceutical industry model in an academic research setting in the Bredesen Lab at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA and for the Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA. As a result of the team's efforts over the last 5 years, they have one drug candidate in clinical trials. 

In addition to Patricia's research (which includes publishing and giving presentations at international scientific meetings such as the Alzheimer’s Association International and the Society for Neuroscience Conferences), she gives presentations to the lay public. As prevention and delay of disease onset is as important as treatment, the focus of the talks for the public is “Lowering the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease”; the series includes “Output: Body & Mind”, “Intake: Nutrition & AD”, “Alzheimer’s Rx”, "The Top Modifiable Risk Factors for AD", and “Terms of Aging Biology”.

Patricia Renaut Spilman, Senior Staff Scientist, Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA and the Drug Discovery Lab, Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA (joint appointment)

BA in Physiology and Anatomy, UC Berkeley CA; Master's in Physiology and Behavioral Biology, San Francisco State University

My Articles & Research on Tech-enhanced Life

The Top Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease

This article describes the top modifiable Alzheimer's risk factors, and explains what you can do to reduce them. Currently there are no truly effective disease-altering treatments for Alzheimer's, and by 2050 13 million Americans are predicted to have Alzheimer's. The good news is that a number...